March 19, 2017

Issue 02 – March 2007

By In Volume 4 2007

Recommended Reads

If you are an independent, small press, or traditional publisher and would like to submit your book(s) for consideration to “Recommended Reads,” click here.</>

Millennial Harvest: Life and
Collected Poems

By Charles Greenleaf Bell
www.lumenbooks.org
(Autobiography)
A towering, intellectual book of essays, poems, and personal narrative in the tradition of Dante’s La Vita Nova.

Wearing the Spider
By Susan Schaab
www.galavantpress.com
(Fiction)
A fast-paced, high-tech thriller about a female attorney who gets caught in a web of sexual harassment, identity theft, and political intrigue.

A View from the Cheap Seats
By Ryan Latimer


www.aventinepress.com
(Nonfiction)
Advice and opinions about life from a 23-year-old who views the world from the cheap seats.

How to Start a Virtual
Bankruptcy Assistant Service

By Victoria Ring


www.graphicopublishing.com
(Nonfiction)
Comprehensive manual on how to start your own business working as a virtual bankruptcy assistant for attorneys nationwide.

Coyote Jack
By Jack Lyndon Thomas


www.lyndonjacks.com
(Memoir)
Compelling personal account of a soldier’s experiences and adventures in Vietnam that led him to a fuller and more meaningful understanding of life.

The People of the Sea
By Scott Marcano


www.peopleofthesea.com
(Fiction)
Imaginative tale about the desperate struggle of two young lovers separated by war, trying to find each other while fighting to find a fantastic world built upon the sea.
…Read Review

Melinda and the Wild West
By Linda Weaver Clarke


www.lindaweaverclarke.com
(Fiction)
Engaging story about a young woman from Boston who moves to the Wild West in 1896 and faces many dangers and obstacles, including a mysterious stranger who offers her love.

A Dog Called Leka
By Willard Manus


www.vivecasmithpublishing.com
(Children/Young Adult Fiction)
Exciting yarn about an American boy, his remarkable dog, and their adventures as they sail among the Greek isles in a catamaran built by the boy himself.

Before I Go
By Riley Weston

www.campfirepress.com
(Fiction)
Touching story about a young Olympic hopeful, the compelling bond between a mother and daughter, and true love.

Cyber Lies: When Finding
The Truth Matters

By John Paul Lucich


www.cyberlies.com
(Nonfiction)
Informative how-to manual for spouses who want to discover the truth about their husbands or wives by using computer forensics in cases involving divorce, fraud, and deception.

A Nation Gone Blind:
America in an Age of Simplification and Deceit

By Eric Larsen


www.ericlarsen.net
(Nonfiction)
&nbsp Three compelling essays about how America has become increasingly blind to its steady drift into political and intellectual tyranny.
…Read Review

Unacceptable: The Federal
Response to Hurricane Katrina

By Walter M. Brasch


www.walterbrasch.com
(Nonfiction)
A well-researched examination of Hurricane Katrina and why the government’s response to it was a systematic failure at all levels.

Intertwined in Limbo: Tales
of Horror and the Outre

By David Maurice Garrett
www.lulu.com/davidgarrett
(Fiction)
A provocative collection of short horror stories, weird tales, and bizarre poetry.

American Hiroshima
By David D. Dionisi


www.trafford.com/04-2229
(Nonfiction)
An in-depth study of why the United States should develop new strategies to deal with the root causes of terrorism or suffer the consequences of terrorist attacks many times worse than 9/11.

 

If you are an independent, small press, or traditional publisher and would like to submit your book(s) for consideration to “Recommended Reads,”

click here.

 

Book submission deadline is
the 20th of each month.

 

Links For Independent Writers & Publishers

• Publishers Marketing Association (PMA): Largest non-profit trade association helping independent publishers
• Small Press Center: Non-profit organization designed to help small independent book publishers
• Bookwired.com: Author/reader resource for book reviews and news
• WriteLinks.com: Complete list of book publishers & publishing info
• Acqweb: Book acquisition site for librarians
• Books-in-Print.com: Registry of electronic publications
• Bowker.com: Major book and publishing data
• PubEasy.com: E-commerce site for global bookselling
• Published.com: Informative and helpful site for independent writers and self-publishers.
• The Center for the Book: Book fairs & literary events
• American Booksellers Association: Organization for independently owned bookstores
• Business.com: Site listing book distributors and wholesalers
• Dowse: A list of e-book publishers
• Internet Publishing: Tips about online publishing from Piers Anthony
• Online Books Page: Listings of books online, news, & features
• Independent Publishers Bestsellers Hall of Fame: Title says it all
• Book Sense.com: Family of bookseller Web sites
• Nospine.com: Independent authors from around the world
• Author Yellow Pages: Online author directory
• Dan Poynter’s Para Publishing: The Godfather of self publishing
• Bookcrossing.com: Global book club & reading group
• Newradiance.com: Over 90 pages of inspired marketing ideas for small business owners and self-published authors.

Links For Progressive Publications & Organizations

• MoveOn.org: Influential democracy in action group
• The Nation.com: “Unconventional wisdom since 1865.”
• Op/EdNews.com: “Progressive news and essays.”
• Air America Radio: “Unabashed liberal talk radio and humor.”
• Counterpunch: Hard-hitting alternative news and essays
• Buzzflash.com: Headlines and stories from dozens of alternative publications
• Democracy Now!: Complete and comprehensive presentation of alternative news and analysis with Amy Goodman leading the charge.
• Brad Blog: Up-to-date progressive news & opinions.
• NPR.org: National listener supported news and information.
• Pacifica Radio: Listener-sponsored radio featuring alternative news and community service.
• Greg Palast.com: One-man army of investigative journalism.
• From the Wilderness: Radical alternative news and essays
• Tom Paine.com: Alternative news and essays
• Mother Jones.com: Alternative and environmental news
• Liberalism Resurgent: Wealth of information on liberalism & politics
• The Foundation for Taxpayers & Consumer Rights: Loads of information about social and consumer issues
• TvNewsLies.org: A compendium of TV news lies
• In the Spotlight: Unsettling information about the voting process in America
• The Rest of Story: Alternative news on the media
• Judicial Watch: Legal watchdog information
• The Center for Public Integrity: Public service journalism
• PFAW.org: People for the American Way

Cutting-Edge Renewable
Energy Companies Ready
To Hit American Market

Citizenre and Octillion lead the way for the mass production of affordable renewable energy in the 21st century.

By J. F. Miglio

As a devotee of renewable energy for the past 27 years, I am always on the lookout for new companies that attempt to break the stranglehold of the fossil fuels industry on the United States and at the same time offer a cleaner, less polluting alternative to the American public that helps ameliorate global climate change.

I think I found two companies that are ready to do just that. The first one is Citizenre, a company that claims it is going to build the largest photovoltaic (PV) cell plant in the United States that will be able to mass produce PV panels and make them cost effective for all homeowners.

In addition, Citizenre maintains that it can do this without charging the homeowner for the PV panels or their installation. Instead, the company intends to install the panels on homeowner rooftops for free, connect the panels into the homeowners’ existing energy grid (known as net metering), and only charge homeowners for the cost of their average monthly energy bill.

In other words, homeowners will rent the PV panels from Citizenre for the cost of their monthly energy bill and pay each month’s total bill to Citizenre instead of their local utility. There is also a $500 refundable deposit involved, but no other costs or upfront charges, according to the company.

In today’s market, when a homeowner purchases a solar energy system from a PV company, the system is quite expensive– even with federal and state tax credits and incentives– costing the homeowner any where from $20,000 to $40,000 for an average installation. This high price tag is cost prohibitive for many Americans, and it is the main reason why only affluent or environmentally dedicated Americans install PV panels on their rooftops. But all that is about to change with Citizenre’s unique rental program that will make solar energy systems affordable to everyone.

It almost sounds too good to be true. As a result I have found several Web sites that question Citizenre’s ability to follow through on all their claims. At this point, no one can say for certain, but Citizenre’s Web site material and video (narrated by Ed Begley Jr.) seem very convincing and authentic, and I have signed up to be one of their “ecopreneurs.”

But I ask all of you to read the company’s material and judge for yourselves, and if this company does not follow through on its claims to home owners or with its contracts to its ecopreneurs, I can assure you I will be the first one to expose them in this column.

To read Citizenre’s information and see the Ed Begley presentation, click here.

To find out about becoming an ecopreneur, click here.

The second renewable energy company that I found is even more cutting edge and innovative than Citizenre. It is called Octillion, and it is a research and development company that has come up with a brand new technology for using existing glass windows on a home to generate energy from the sun. The way this technology works is “by integrating films of silicon nanoparticles on glass surfaces” which then transfer the sun’s rays into photoelectric energy that powers the home.

I’m no scientist and I know very little about nanotechnology, but the idea is very exciting, because if it works in a practical application, homeowners could use this technology on the existing windows of their homes without having to add or change a home’s infrastructure.

According to a spokesman for Octillion, the company has already proved its thesis in a practical demonstration and has surpassed several milestones to bring this technology to the market.

Once again, I can’t say for sure whether this company will pan out to be one of the renewable energy companies that change the future of energy use in the United States, but it sounds quite promising, and if its technology turns out to be cost effective in the market place, it will radically change the way all of us use energy in our homes in the 21st century.

Needless to say, both Citizenre and Octillion would help global climate change because it would displace the use of fossil fuels as a primary energy source for home heating and air conditioning.

For more information about Octillion, click here.

 


Click here for info
Click here to become Ecopreneur

Featured Book

A bone-chilling political
morality fable…

— Midwest Book Review

Sunshine Assassins by John F. Miglio

Buy Sunshine Assassins by John F. Miglio

 

Buy Sunshine Assassins by John F. Miglio
Sunshine Assassins
By John F. Miglio
(Fiction)
Controversial political thriller about a band of democratic rebels and their attempt to overthrow the corporate fascist shadow government in the USA…Read Reviews

 

Book of the Year
(Nonfiction 2006)

OR Book of the year 2006

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Your Daily Walk with the Great
Minds of the Past and Present

By Richard A. Singer Jr.


A terrific inspirational guide to personal transformation and spiritual development that uses quotes of famous people and insightful advice for every day of the year.

 

Book of the Year
(Fiction 2006)

OR Book of the Year 2006

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Hollywood and Sunset
By Luke Salisbury


Witty and well written story about a writer from the East who takes a life-altering tour of 1916 Hollywood– in the company of D.W. Griffith, Lillian Gish, and Howard Gaye, an actor who likes to dress up as Jesus Christ.

 

Book of the Year
(Nonfiction 2005)

OR Book of the Year 2005

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Bush on the Couch
By Justin A. Frank, M.D.


A compelling and insightful look into George W. Bush’s psyche, and how his deep-seeded fears, insecurities, and megalomania have undermined the safety of our country.

 

Book of the Year
(Fiction 2005)

OR Books of the Year 2005

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Clearing Customs
By Martha Egan


A sinister, yet amusing tale of an ex-hippie owner of a small, struggling Latin American imports store who joins with her friends to fight corrupt custom officials whose harassment threatens to put her out of business.

 

Books of the Year
(Nonfiction 2004)

OR Books of the Year 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
The Assassination of
Julius Caesar

By Michael Parenti


Award-winning author and scholar examines ancient Roman history from a populist viewpoint, arguing that Caesar was assassinated for being a champion of the people.

OR Books of the Year 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
The War on Freedom
By Nafeez Mossaddeq Ahmed


Riveting and well-researched expose of how and why America was attacked on 9/11, including information about faked terrorism and mass media manipulation by the Bush administration.

OR Books of the Year 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Crossing the Rubicon
By Michael Ruppert


Hard-hitting, iconoclastic editor/publisher of “From the Wilderness” strips the power elite to the bone and takes a shocking look at the decline of the American empire at the end of the age of oil.

 

Books of the Year
(Fiction 2004)

OR Books of the Year 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
Candle in a Dark Time
By Virginia Stuart


Compelling, emotionally charged story of how a Danish woman risks her life to save Jews from Nazis during World War II.

OR Books of the Year 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
My Life: A Story
By Jesus Christ

By Christopher Miller


Innovative and provocative story of the life of Jesus Christ told as a first person narrative.

OR Books of the 2004

bn.com

 

amazon.com
The Others at Monticello
By Esther Franklin


Award-winning historical novel that explores the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and his slaves, especially Sally Hemings and her children.

 

If you are an independent, small press, or traditional publisher and would like to submit your book(s) for consideration to “Recommended Reads,”

click here.

 

Book submission deadline is
the 20th of each month.

 

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