Issue 8 – September 2004

Current Affairs Essay
Classic 1960s Battle: Hip Against Straight by J. F. Miglio
Recommended Reads - Independent Publishers
Candle in a Dark Time By Virginia Stuart
Corporations Stripped Naked By Ed Rychkun
Baby of BataanBy Joseph Quitman Johnson
Confessions of a Corporate Centurion By Gordon S. Reiss
Advanced Writing: Fiction and Film By Wells Earl Draughon
How to Develop Peace in the World By Simon Monbaron
The Others at Monticello By Esther Franklin
My Life: A Story by Jesus Christ By Christopher Miller
The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss By James W. Kemp
The Real Deal: A Spiritual Guide for Black Teen Girls By Billie Montgomery Cook
Reflections on Death, Dying and Bereavement By William A. Smith
Death 101: A Workbook for Educating and Healing By Sandra Helene Straub
Recommended Reads - Traditional Publishers
The Exception to the Rulers By By Amy Goodman
Bushworld: Enter at Your Own Risk By Maureen Dowd
House of Bush, House of Saud By Craig Unger
The Great Unraveling By Paul Krugman
Corporateering By Jamie Court
The Assassination of Julius Caesar By Michael Parenti
American Dynasty By Kevin Phillips
The Best Democracy Money Can Buy By Greg Palast
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them By Al Franken
The Great Big Book of Tomorrow: A Treasury of Cartoons By Tom Tomorrow
America: Who Really Pays the Taxes? By Bartlett & Steele
Acid Dreams By Lee & Shlain

Recommended Reads
If you are an independent or small press publisher and would like to submit your book(s) for consideration to” Recommended Reads,” click here.

Candle in a Dark Time
By Virginia Stuart


www.redhummingbirdpress.com
(Fiction) Compelling, emotionally charged story of how a Danish woman risks her life to save Jews from Nazis during World War II.

Corporations Stripped Naked
By Ed Rychkun


www.rrpbooks.com
(Non-fiction) Laugh-out-loud satire of corporate America and how employees who want to succeed in business today must develop their AQ (“asshole quotient.”)

Baby of Bataan
By Joseph Quitman Johnson


jimweeks12@msn.com
(Memoir) Incredible, action-packed, coming-of-age tale of a 14-year-old soldier’s adventures and heroism in World War II.

Confessions of a
Corporate Centurion

By Gordon S. Reiss


fourcontpress@hotmail.com
(Memoir) Business executive with 30 years experience recounts his adventures and escapades while working abroad as a high-level “corporate centurion.”

Advanced Writing:
Fiction and Film

By Wells Earl Draughon


www.WellsEarlDraughon.com
(Non-fiction) Comprehensive advanced writing tips and techniques for serious writers who are interested in writing fiction for novels or film.

How to Develop
Peace in the World

By Simon Monbaron


www.PeaceToCome.com
(Non-fiction) Illuminating spiritual philosophy describes how to connect with God and develop world peace.

The Others at Monticello
By Esther Franklin


www.xlibris.com
(Historical Fiction) Award-winning book that explores the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and his slaves, especially Sally Hemings and her children

My Life: A Story
by Jesus Christ

By Christopher Miller


www.mylifebyjesuschrist.com
(Memoir) Innovative and compelling story of the life of Jesus Christ told as a first person narrative.

The Gospel According
to Dr. Seuss

By James W. Kemp


www.judsonpress.com
(Non-fiction) The Bible and Dr. Seuss team up for inspirational reading for parents to share with their kids.

The Real Deal: A Spiritual
Guide for Black Teen Girls

By Billie Montgomery Cook


www.judsonpress.com
(Non-fiction) Hard-nosed, yet compassionate spiritual and real world advice for black teenage girls and their parents.

Reflections on Death,
Dying and Bereavement

By William A. Smith


www.baywood.com
(Non-fiction) A practical guide for clergy, counselors and speakers of giving spiritual solace and advice to people in need.

Death 101: A Workbook for
Educating and Healing

By Sandra Helene Straub


www.baywood.com
(Non-fiction) A comprehensive workbook written for professional counselors and caregivers on how to deal with the subject of death.

 

If you are an independent or small press publisher and would like to submit your book(s) for consideration to” Recommended Reads,”

click here.

 

Book submission deadline is
the 20th of each month.

 

Links For Independent Writers & Publishers

• Publishers Marketing Association (PMA): Largest non-profit trade association helping independent publishers
• Small Press Center: Non-profit organization designed to help small independent book publishers
• WriteLinks.com: Complete list of book publishers & publishing info
• Acqweb: Book acquisition site for librarians
• Books-in-Print.com: Registry of electronic publications
• Bowker.com: Major book and publishing data
• PubEasy.com: E-commerce site for global bookselling
• Published.com: Informative and helpful site for independent writers and self-publishers.
• The Center for the Book: Book fairs & literary events
• American Booksellers Association: Organization for independently owned bookstores
• Business.com: Site listing book distributors and wholesalers
• Dowse: A list of e-book publishers
• Internet Publishing: Tips about online publishing from Piers Anthony
• Online Books Page: Listings of books online, news, & features
• Independent Publishers Bestsellers Hall of Fame: Title says it all
• Book Sense.com: Family of bookseller Web sites
• Nospine.com: Independent authors from around the world
• Author Yellow Pages: Online author directory
• Dan Poynter’s Para Publishing: The Godfather of self publishing
• Bookcrossing.com: Global book club & reading group
• Newradiance.com: Over 90 pages of inspired marketing ideas for small business owners and self-published authors.

Kerry vs. Bush
Classic 1960s Battle:
Hip Against Straight

By J. F. Miglio

In the late1960s and early ’70s, the mainstream news media stupidly (and quite typically, as we have discovered) chose to oversimplify the drama and importance of that era by neatly dividing the nation into two distinct camps. Anyone who protested against the Vietnam War and the corrupting influences of Big Business and the CIA was cast in pejorative terms: “radicals,” “peaceniks,” “anarchists.”

In fact, without actually coming right out and saying it– although they were not averse to using the full force of selective imagery or subliminal messages to underscore their meaning– the mainstream news media frequently depicted the protestors as the bad guys, or at very least, left-wing nuts who wanted to turn America into a decadent socialist state.

In contrast, they depicted anyone who supported the Vietnam War and had no beef with Big Business or the CIA as the good guys; they were the “patriots,” the “true Americans,” the “silent majority” (to use Richard Nixon’s term) who wanted to keep America the way it was, a “Pleasantville” frozen in a 1950s paradigm.

At the time, anyone with half a brain (in other words, about 10% of the American public) realized what the media was doing and tried to convince them that by stereotyping Americans and dividing them into two opposing camps was not good for democracy or the future of the country.

Naturally, it fell on deaf ears, and the situation became even more divisive as many protestors against the Vietnam War became targeted by the police and blacklisted by the government, including Vietnam vets who protested against the war when they returned home. As a result, the country became even more polarized and paranoid.

On one side were the “doves,” Americans who were against the war. Although there were notable exceptions, most doves were anti-establishment iconoclasts who supported equal rights for women and minorities.

Yes, many of them smoked pot and experimented with hallucinogenic drugs; studied Eastern religions and engaged in free love; grew their hair long and attended political demonstrations (as was shown over and over by the media). But many of them were also very studious and ambitious (like Bill Clinton), or willing to risk their lives or reputations for what they believed in (like John Kerry). In short, they were “hip.”

On the other side were the “hawks,” Americans who supported the Vietnam War. Although there were notable exceptions, most hawks were pro-establishment conformists who wanted to keep women and minorities in their place.

For the most part, they hated pot and psychedelic drugs, did not stray from their religious or cultural heritage, wore their hair short and attended church picnics or Kiwanis Club meetings.

Like their hip counterparts, many of them also were very studious and ambitious (like Newt Gingrich) or willing to risk their lives or reputations for what they believed in (like Oliver North). In short, they were “straight.”

Hipsters admired JFK, Gore Vidal, and John Maynard Keynes; straights admired Nixon, William F. Buckley Jr., and Ayn Rand.

The difference between the two sides could not have been more striking. But it would all come down to one event that would determine the future of the country, one political match-up that would prove which side would win the hearts and minds of the American public for the foreseeable future: the 1972 presidential election between Richard Nixon, the hawkish candidate with the undistinguished military career who represented the silent majority, or the dovish George McGovern, a genuine World War II hero, who represented the anti-war movement. Sound familiar?

Of course, we all know the outcome of that election: McGovern got trounced, and Nixon became Prez, only to resign in disgrace. Ironically, Nixon did get us out of Vietnam– better late than never– but it took the most hawkish of the hawks of the Vietnam era, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, to finally publicly admit a few years ago– again, better late than never– that the war was a big mistake.
…Read More

 

News & Analysis

Health care for all Californians could become a reality by next year. Read about Senate Bill 921.

Will the U.S re-instate the draft after the election?

“They’re as Bad as Wal-Mart” Starbucks Workers Get Organized!

Gore Vidal comments on the State of the Union, 2004

Frivolous lawsuits are not the cause of high insurance costs to doctors. Greedy pharmaceutical companies are the culprits.

Greg Palast and Michael Moore proclaim: “Don’t let them steal Florida again!”

Despite being under an investigative cloud, Halliburton contracts continue to balloon.

The number of Americans in poverty and without health insurance rises by over one million in 2003.

Recommended Reads

If you are a traditional publishing house and would like to submit your books for consideration to “Recommended Reads,” click here.

The Exception to the Rulers
By Amy Goodman
(Nonfiction; Hyperion)

Hard-hitting, progressive journalist exposes “oily politicians, war profiteers, and the media that love them.”…Read Review

Bushworld: Enter at
Your Own Risk

By Maureen Dowd
(Nonfiction; Putnam)

A compilation of clever and witty essays psychoanalyizing George W. Bush and company.…Read Review

House of Bush, House of Saud
By Craig Unger
(Nonfiction; Scribner)

Very well researched and documented book showing the connections between Bush and the royal family in Saudi Arabia.…Read Review

The Great Unraveling
By Paul Krugman
(Nonfiction; W.W. Norton & Co.)

Award-winning liberal economist exposes corrupt and destructive policies of Bush administration.…Read Review

Corporateering
By Jamie Court
(Nonfiction; Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam)

Alarming and fact-filled expose on “how corporate power steals your personal freedom and what you can do about it.” …Read Review

The Assassination of
Julius Caesar

By Michael Parenti
(Nonfiction; The New Press)

Pulitzer-prize nominated author examines ancient Roman history from a populist viewpoint. …Read Review

American Dynasty
By Kevin Phillips
(Nonfiction; Viking)

Former GOP strategist and respected author exposes four generations of Bush family privilege and corruption.…Read Review

The Best Democracy
Money Can Buy

By Greg Palast
(Nonfiction; Plume)

Investigative journalist exposes “the truth about corporate cons, globalization, and high-finance fraudsters.”…Read Review

Lies and the Lying Liars
Who Tell Them

By Al Franken
(Nonfiction;E.P. Dutton)

Humorist/satirist takes a “fair and balanced look at the Right.”…Read Review

The Great Big Book of
Tomorrow: A Treasury
of Cartoons

By Tom Tomorrow
(Fiction: St. Martin’s Griffin)

Compendium of laugh-out-loud political cartoons by the premier progressive cartoonist working today.…Read Review

America: Who Really
Pays the Taxes?

By Bartlett & Steele
(Nonfiction; Touchstone)

Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporters’ comprehensive, fact-filled expose on the unfair tax system in U.S.…Read Review

Acid Dreams
By Lee & Shlain
(Nonfiction; Grove Press)

Seminal work tracing history of CIA’s use of LSD on unsuspecting American citizens and mental patients.…Read Review

 

Recommended Classics

The Rebel
By Albert Camus
(Nonfiction; Vintage Books)

Existential writer/thinker par excellence examines why human beings rebel.…Read About

The Jungle
By Upton Sinclair
(Fiction; Independent Publishers Group)

Groundbreaking story of unfair and destructive forces of Big Business exploiting working poor in early 20th century America.…Read About

To Have or To Be
By Erich From
(Nonfiction; Bantam)

Brilliant examination of the choice individuals make between materialism and spirituality, and the consequences of that choice.…Read About

 

If you are an traditional publisher and would like to submit your books for consideration to “Recommended Reads,”

click here.

 

Book submission deadline is
the 20th of each month.

 

Links For Progressive Publications & Organizations

• MoveOn.org: Influential democracy in action group
• The Nation.com: “Unconventional wisdom since 1865.”
• Air America Radio: “Unabashed liberal talk radio and humor.”
• Counterpunch: Hard-hitting alternative news and essays
• Buzzflash.com: Headlines and stories from dozens of alternative publications
• Democracy Now!: Complete and comprehensive presentation of alternative news and analysis with Amy Goodman leading the charge.
• NPR.org: National listener supported news and information.
• Pacifica Radio: Listener-sponsored radio featuring alternative news and community service.
• Greg Palast.com: One-man army of investigative journalism.
• From the Wilderness: Radical alternative news and essays
• Tom Paine.com: Alternative news and essays
• Mother Jones.com: Alternative and environmental news
• Liberalism Resurgent: Wealth of information on liberalism & politics
• The Foundation for Taxpayers & Consumer Rights: Loads of information about social and consumer issues
• TvNewsLies.org: A compendium of TV news lies
• In the Spotlight: Unsettling information about the voting process in America
• The Rest of Story: Alternative news on the media
• Judicial Watch: Legal watchdog information
• The Center for Public Integrity: Public service journalism
• PFAW.org: People for the American Way

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